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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 5,755 (some duplicates have been removed)
. they express views that the u.s. government kids radicals. secondly one of the persons is deemed by the nsa to be a u.s. person. means heap is a citizen or gre card holder which entitles him to increase protections under
the law. americans, u.s. persons are not exempt from this program. then thirdly, there is a long, ugly history, lawrence in the united states of the u.s. government deeming certain ideas radical. such as the civil rights movement. or socialist and communist. or, anti-war protesters. then taking action to destroy them either their reputations or, their, their professions. and, i think we all ought to be aware of that history and wary of these kind of programs.
they would have in freeing to t undermine them? >> of course if the u.s. government believes there are people in the world who are expressing view points that are dangerous, of course the u.s. government like any government wants to go out and undermine them. there are a lot of people who express radical views all the time including on lots of cable tv stations i would look to go in and undermine. that doesn't mean i want the state trolling through the most private data and releasing it to the world to humiliate them and destroy their reputations. that's not something that we want the state, authorized to do. remember we are talking here,
anybody the u.s. government thinks are radicalizing people with their view points. >> so far there is no case of the nsa actually as you put it releasing this kind of
it should be not, it should not be surprising that the u.s. government uses all of the lawful tools at our disposal to impede the efforts of valid terrorist targets who seek to harm the nation and radicalize others to violence. joining me now for an exclusive interview, glen greenwald. coming to us on a connectionen
denied by the obama administration, appears in the "washington post." it says u.s. intelligence agencies have gained access to hundreds of millions of google and yahoo user accounts by secretly tapping into company data centers. late today, six top tech companies-- yahoo, google, aol, apple, microsoft and facebook-- sent a letter to congress, calling for enhanced privacy protections. barton gellman broke the story for "the washington post."
. a find in the war of drugs. authorities shut down a tunnel between the u.s. and mexico >> a deadly storm system creating problems across the country as it dumps a foot of rain in some parts leading to severe flooding. . >>> welcome to al jazeera america. there are new revelations about just how far the national security agency has gone to spy on internet users. revelations that have reportedly led twitter to set up new types of enciption to protect messages from snoops, something google spent millions doing. facebook is trying to stay a step ahead. now the senate intelligence committee is set to tighten the rules. >> these are the slides leaked by whistleblower edward snowden in june. as long as the national security agency or the federal bureau of investigation are 51% sure that the user is foreign, their emails, audio and video chats, photographs and documents are all theirs for the searching. this >> carefully worded denials followed from the companies, arguing that they give specific information to the u.s. government as legally required on a case-by-case basis. these assurances have
talks that resumed in geneva today between iran and six world powers, including the u.s. is the second round of negotiations on iran's nuclear program since president hassan rouhani took office in august. the proposal would partially with u.s.-led sanctions for six months in return for iran's suspension of nuclear activity. john kerry continues a visit to israel and the occupied west bank in a bid to encourage u.s.- brokered peace talks. he faced palestinian complaints in ramallah on tuesday over israel's continued expansion of west bank settlements. in a rare move, john kerry said the u.s. views israel settlements as illegitimate, going beyond the normal white house language of not helpful. but john kerry stopped short of calling the settlements illegal. >> let me emphasize at this point the position of the united states of america on the considerts is that we now, and have always considered, the settlements to be illegitimate. i want to make it extremely clear that at no time did the agree asans in any way a matter of going back to the talks that they someh condone or
we have very important things to talk about to make certain that the saudi arabian u.s. relationship is on track, moving forward, and doing the things that we need to accomplish. >> washington's main arab ally has concerns with the approach to the conflict in syria. they acknowledge there are divergent obviously on how to end conflict, but the goal remains the same. >> even a limited strike will send a message to assad that no other nation can deliver. but a targeted strike can make assad or any other dictator think twice before using chemical weapons. >> but despite president obama's tough talk a strike never happened. instead the assad regime grayed to account for and aid in destroying it's chemical weapons stock pile. for the u.s. the condition in syria is status quo. meanwhile 2 million syrian versus fled their homes and more are displaced in the country as war conditions. rebels have lost ground to assad forces. neighboring nations are shaking under the weight of refugees, especially lebanon. it now has more than 800,000 syrians nearly a quarter of lebanon's population of $4 mil
into communications from a place inside the united states on u.s. territory you have to have -- you have to do it under either fisa authority or what's called transit authority, but in general you can't just both collect information that would reside in a database of yahoo! or google. if you're doing it from overseas different rules apply. you're not relying on statutory authority. you're not relying on the fisa court. instead you're relying solely on presidential authority under executive order 12333 and there the rules are a little bit different and when you're tapping into a foreign access point you're allowed to presume legally dps you're the n.s.a.s that the people using that
check check >> the u.s. and afghanistan reach a tentative deal to keep u.s. troops past next year as av gab elders gather to talk about the agreement. no deal as world powers try to come to terms on a solution on iran's nuclear program. >> henry trey raydull takes a leave of absence to seek treatment after pleading guilty to the buying of cocaine. >> hello, welcome to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie sy. a decision on the future of u.s. troops in afghanistan now in the hands of a council of tribal leaders. more than a decade after america entered the region thousands of delegates are gathering on thursday, known as the loya jirga. they'll accept or reject a security pact. u.s. forces that remain after next year will receive immunity from afghan courts - that was a key point. also - american forces will not target afghanistan civilians, including in their home. afghanistan will fund the forces. secretary of state john kerry clarified a key part of the deal. >> it is entirely train, equip and desist. there's no combat role for the american forces. the bilateral agreement is an effo
their current plans. aircraft from a massive u.s. carrier ship have joined the relief effort for typhoon haiyan , bringing supplies to those who were left without food or clean water for nearly a week. the official death toll stands at 2357, but expected to rise. initial estimates had well over 10,000 may have died. the philippines health minister has warned it is unlikely all of the dead will be identified. kerryary of state john appeared before congress on wednesday to urge a delay of new sanctions on iran. lawmakers from both already's have vowed to move ahead with a measure targeting iranian oil exports despite the recent progress in talks between iran, the u.s., and five other world powers. speaking to the senate banking committee, john kerry said targeting iran undermines negotiations. >> our hope now is no new sanctions will be put in place for the civil reason that if they are, it could be viewed as bad faith by the people we are negotiating with, it could destroy the ability to be able to get agreement, and it could wind up setting us back in dialogue that has taken 30 years to be able
space. u.s. military planes fly over china's newly claimed air defense zone. >> the supreme court weighs in over obamacare contraceptives - they'll decide if private companies must pay for birth controls even if they have religious objections >> pope francis - he says it's time the faithful help those in need. >>> welcome to al jazeera america. tens of millions of people on the east coast are in the grips of a massive storm. conditions stretch from atlanta to boston, a mix of snow, sleet, ice and heavy rain. with each passing hour roads are trech ourous and flights are cancelled or delayed. we have a team of reporters tracking the impact of the storm. al jazeera's juan carlos molina begins the coverage on how the weather is hampering driving. >> conditions treacherous. the impact unavoidable. scenes like this on highways across america. >> i hydroplaned over here, came off and slid around. >> from michigan a close call from a dashboard camera as a truck loses control - barely missing a car. in flint the weather is blamed for multi-car pile ups. it's dangerous for drivers and emergency cr
interest rates have also allowed people to buy cars and other durable goods, the u.s. auto industry is -- is humming at prerecession levels at this point. and just broadly speaking, i think our financial -- the effects of our policies of financial markets, including low interest rates, have helped american households improve their balance sheets and get themselves in much better financial condition. so broadly, i think that, first of all, our objectives are aimed squarely at, and our objectives are squarely tied to main street, and i think that while it would be better to have even a broader-based effort in washington, to attack these problems, the fed is making an important contribution to middle class, and lower income folks, welfare. >> thanks. and thank you for the non-loaded question that we'll conclude this with from elliot feldman and robert lightan. we will see you at more washington nationals baseball games next year? and, it's a two partner -- yes, go ahead. and, what research topics and books are in your future plans? >> well, first i'd just like to say, i mean it's well-
in the region, and ths state department has been on, engaged, so there has been a u.s. response with the n international community to assist the philippine nal co government. the immediate needs have been in the area of food, water, and medicine, and logistics, long-term needs are going to be the rebuilding of the affected l areas, and clearly that will become a challenge for the ge philippine islands, and for the help of the international community.help o it's personal to many people in america. we have 4 million americans of f filipino descent that live in america. and in the state of maryland, we have 26,000. we and yesterday, with the ambassador's assistance, and jeremy, with your help, we met with representatives of the hel filipino community in maryland,e and they are, obviously, very anxious because they have relatives and friends that werea directly impacted and they are worried about their well being.h they also are frustrated becaush they want to help, and how can they help? que and that's a question we're try going to try to focus on during this hearing, is how can individuals
. >> it was an ambush, we see it as an ambush. >> pakistani leaders blame the u.s. for sabotaging peace talks after a taliban leader was killed in a drone strike. >> a ceasefire in the congo after 16 brutal years of war - but how long will it last? . >>> secretary of state john kerry is in the middle east. his 9-day tour kicks off in israel, jordan and saudi arabia. first a meeting in egypt, a major step towards starting peace talks designed to stop a civil war in syria. >> sue turton has the latest from cairo. >> it's merging that the discussions with nabil fahmy, the egyptian foreign minister, and john kerry, included a situation in regards to syria. we are hearing out of the arab league there was an emergency meeting of foreign minister resist this evening, egyptian time. the egyptian foreign minister will present a vision, initiative that the u.s. and egyptians discussed. if initiative is regarding the geneva ii convention - we know that they are trying to get all parties around the table later on in november, to try to come to some sort of political diplomatic halt to the violence that is goin
they declared an air defense zone over islands controlled by japan. >>> some u.s. lawmakers are skeptical about a deal to limit iran's nuclear program, saying sanctions should not be eased. >>> the new u.s. ambassador to japan, caroline kennedy, is touring areas affected by the 2011 disaster, saying her country will continue to offer support. >>> chinese officials find themselves at the center of a diplomatic dispute. over the weekend, they announced that they'd set up an air defense identification zone over the east china sea. that drew immediate criticism from japan, south korea, and the u.s. and now the chinese are criticizing the americans for how they've reacted. the zone includes air space over the senkaku islands. japan controls the islands, china and taiwan claim them. in terms of international law, japanese officials launched a protest and u.s. officials said they were deeply concerned. now china's foreign ministry has released a statement criticizing the americans for taking sides. the document urged them to stop making irresponsible remarks. the document says the chinese launched a p
from guantanamo bay before he will sign the u.s. security packet. karzi's demands are prompting threats from the u.s. to withdraw all of its forces after 2014. >>> an overloaded sail boyt carrying people from haiti overturned in the bahamas. video released by the u.s. coast guard shows about 100 haitians clinging to a boat, believed to have capitalsized after it struck a reef in rough water. about 110 people have been rescued so far including 19 women. and those are the headlines of this hour. tony harris. more news. "inside story" is next. >> the u.s. plays hardball with hamid karzai. sign the troop deal or we are out. i am ray suarez. >> that's the insi"inside story" >> america's longest war is almost over, but the transition to the next phase in the u.s.-afghanistan relationship involves a difficult diplomatic dance. the united states negotiated a deal called "the bilateral security accord" which would keep most troops in the country when nato's 75,000 leave next year. the deal hit a signnag. afghan president karzai presented a new last-minute set of demands. on this edition of "insi
that saysndependent" is britain still spy in where the u.s. fears to tread? there was discovered to be a u.s. by net on top of this in berlin. a german broadcaster was able to discover, we can seek out these images, a heat map, infrared after it emerged the u.s. had found,angela merkel's the activity dropped off. despite that, the independent headline that there could possibly a bs by net at the british embassy and are not stopping activity. it has not been confirmed but the independent have documented that a few people are operating under cover and most of the colleagues do not know the true mission. facedernments have backlash in the u.k. in the united states. >> that is right. taking a look at the new york times. says we will not spy on our friends anymore, actually we do not have friends anymore. the u.s. and u.k. are under pressure. u.s. states are trying to take the power into their own hands and not waiting on the white house, congress to come up with comprehensive policy. state lawmakers want to try to find a solution themselves. more than 10 states have passed two dozen privacy laws alone.
keep the u.s. in afghanistan for ten years or more. >>> sounding a warning. from the faa, about what they see as a growing danger to modern aviation. >>> and a letter from jackie, seen for the first time, written to another woman who lost her husband to oswald's bullets that day in dallas, tonight, she shares her memory with tom brokaw. "nightly news" begins now. >>> good evening. it was bad enough that a lot of bad behavior by big banks contributed to the great recession a few years back, sinking the finances of so many american families. it all started, of course, with the housing crisis and so many americans have been frustrated that it did not end with stiffer penalties for those who caused it. very few have paid any price at all for what went on. that changed in a big way today as jpmorgan has agreed to pay $13 billion to the federal government. that's the most money any company has ever paid to the feds. we begin there tonight with our justice correspondent, pete williams, at the justice department for us tonight. pete, good evening. >> reporter: brian, good evening. and just t
from state department and u.s. aid officials held by the foreign relations subcommittee. this is live coverage on c-span3. >>> good morning. let me welcome you all to the subcommittee on east asia and the pacific for the senate foreign relations committee. let me thank chairman menendez for allowing us to conduct this subcommittee hearing on such short notice. senator rubio, thank you very much for your help and your staff's help in arranging this hearing in record time. when we say the senate can't act quickly, we did act quickly on putting this hearing together, and i very much appreciate that, all the people who worked to make this possible. nice to see you again, we were together yesterday, billy, referred to that, but the filipino ambassador to the united states is a friend and has been extremely helpful to us. shortly after the typhoon, we had a chance to talk, and at that time i expressed our deep condolence on the loss of life as a result of the typhoon, and america's interest to exercise leadership internationally in assisting the filipinos in the recovery, saving lives, and
. >> in the 1980s. the u.s. provided hundreds of millions of dollars in to el salvador. >> well armed units then went out on the offensive, and typically those were the units that were responsible for the worst massacres. >> possibly the worst in latin american history, more than 800 people were killed by the u.s. trained battalion. it was led by doming domingo alta rosa. >> a deputy in the legislative where assembly. >> you were a very successful counterinsurgency commander. what do you think was the we to your success? >> people from tsa santa marta see it quite differently. carlos bunilla heads a farming cooperative in this village. >> why do you think the parents are responsible for so much that took place here? >> colonel, i've spoken to more than a dozen people who say they have direct experience of atrocities that were conducted under your command. >> clearly, there were many atrocities that were commit. i heard a story about a pregnant woman whose baby were cut out of her stomach, thrown up in the air, and the fetus was stabbed. >> why were so many civilians killed touring the war h
british u.s..ador u.s to the he served as ambassador from 2007-2012. from london, this is a little more than an hour. >> order. is second witness today currently a visiting professor of the department of war studies in london. was the ambassador to the u.s. from 2007-2012. remarks --open name to have any opening remarks to put things in context. >> my starting point is that the u.k.-u.s. relationship remains the most important in the uk's international relationships. it starts with the sharing of values. to me it is remarkable that despite the many cultural and other differences between us we still today, by and large, have most an approach to of the problems that confront us. so far we have -- the heart of the relationship is a remarkably close a set of defense, nuclear and intelligence connections and a habit of comprehensive and intimate foreign policy consultation. all that rests on foundations which are largely unseen and mainly nongovernmental. ,hat is the human links centuries-old, the vibrant cultural and educational connections and a remarkably --cessful, but often commercial a
killed in a u.s. drone strike. as the pakistani government try to reach a cease- fire with the telegram. pakistani officials say four other officials were killed in the strike. there was a bombing that killed seven u.s. security officials from an afghan military base in 2009. it was reported he had been killed three years ago, but later resurfaced. snowden seek asylum in germany next? there is heated debate on that question just a week after allegations that the nsa was tapping angela merkel's mobile phone. it is the most serious diplomatic tensions since germany opposed the u.s.-led iraq invasion. according to a german lawmaker, american met in moscow. crowded into the press conference to see what there was to say about the meeting with edward snowden and the letter to the government. edward snowden be willing to talk to german investigators or politicians or even come to germany to be interviewed? he could come to germany if it were guaranteed that he would be secure in germany or a comparable country. the green and the left party want to question snowden about u.s. surveillance activ
tells the bbc a u.s. drone strike has killed its leader, one of the world's most wanted men. gunmen opening fire at los angeles national airport, killing a security agent and winning several others. and first moscow, now berlin, former american contractor edward snowden says he will help a u.s. -- a german investigation into u.s. surveillance programs. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. a high-ranking taliban official says the leader of the taliban and pakistan has been killed in a u.s. drone strike. the missiles are said to have targeted his house and his car in the north, as a meeting was underway. others, including his brother, are also reported to have died in the attack. richard galpin is following developments from islamabad. i spoke with him just a short time ago. richard, what has been the reactions to the death? >> certainly amongst politicians here in islamabad, particularly the opposition, there has been real dismay about what has happened. some of them describing it as a deliberate attempt by the united states to try to s
: delighted to be with you. >> host: you serve as ambassador to the u.s., pakistan's ambassador to the u.s. from 2008 to 2011. you advised the late benazir bhutto and you are now professor at austin university and the director of the south and central asia hudson institute. you write extensively for "the new york times," "the wall street journal" and the national tribune to name a few of the publication so you obviously have a very inside view of this relationship and i think just the title is strong of u.s. policy toward pakistan and in your words if i may quote you say the u.s. pakistan relationship, a tale of exaggerated expectations, broken promises and disastrous misunderstandings. i want to delve into what you mean by that a little later in the interview but first i want to ask you a simple question. what motivated you to write this book? >> guest: this book has been on my mind for many years. i was a college student in 1979 when several of my colleagues -- i was in karachi in the south of pakistan but my colleagues as students in islamabad even in burn down the u.s. consulate the ho
. >> former president mohamed morsi - a visit from the u.s. secretary of state. >> i'm kath turner in new york where officials are battling two unprecedented events - hurricane sandy, and the two boston marathon bombings. >>> let's take you straight to cairo, where the u.s. secretary of state john kerry is holding a press conference with the egyptian foreign minister. i believe that we are listening to nazar speaking. >>... we believe that they are important for egypt. we'd like to further enhance this relationship in the interests of both countries, based on the priorities of each country. this afternoon, mr secretary, you are due to meet with the president and general abdul fatah al-sisi. for our part here at the foreign ministerry, we held constructive, frank and detailed construction of various issues and discussed how to move things forward in the interests of both countries. i affirm egypt's desire to have good and point of view relationship with the united states, based on our own priorities. >> translation: we'll open the floor for questions and then meet the president. >> we'll give
another day without food and water. >> the u.s. government is helping us and various other international governments are helping us. we continue to bring support to people affected. >> the relief supplies are not getting to those that need it most. the government sending in troops to control the looting. also at the airport survivors determined to go back to the disaster area, despite all they'd been through. >> imagine if you will, the courage of these people here in cebu at the air force base. many of them from mr during the storm. they are waiting here for a c130 hercules to arrive, to take them back into the devastated area. why? in those bags are food and water - things that they say their family needs to survive. these survivors say the government aid is not reaching families fast enough, and going back is their only option. >> i'm scared, but i have - i have no choice. i have no choice. my family is in tacloban. >> international relief is on the way. the united states has directed the carrier, the uss "george washington" to head to the philippines who provide support. u.s. marine
. >> hi, i'm lisa flesher and you're in the stream. pakistan and the u.s., friends, enemies orr friend mys. we take an independent look at this complicated relationship. our digital producer bringing in all your live feedback of which we have tons today. >> all angles. international tweets. and pakistanis can agree they agree on knock. then we have brandon. pakistan wants what the u.s. has but hates what they stand for. and here is my favorite comment on facebook. united states has had an arranged marriage, they are always in court filing before divorce, by the end of staying married, but living separated but america still has to pay child support, after all there was love at some point. >> and the kids being the people of both countries totally confused. >> . >> drones, nukes, the talibans and anti-sentiments. these are just some of the issues that are complicated the fractures u.s. pakistan alliance since 9/11. pakistan is a recipient of a huge chunk of military aid. but mutual mistrust and the arms of groups brought into questions whether both countries stage share a strategi
is almost over, but the transition to the next phase in the u.s.-afghanistan relationship involves a difficult diplomatic dance. the united states negotiated a deal called "the bilateral security accord" which would keep most troops in the country when nato's 75,000 leave next year. the deal hit a signnag. afghan president karzai presented a new last-minute set of demands. on this edition of "inside story" we will discuss america's future in afghanistan. first, this background: >> afghan president hamid karzai again refused to sign the bilateral security agreement on monday. instead, adding more items to a growing list of demands. it was during a last-minute meeting with u.s. national security advisor susan rice that karzi insisted the u.s. would need to start peace talks with the taliban and release 17 after gangs from guantanamo bay before the bilateral security agreement got his signature. over. >> if the agreement isn't signed promptly, what i said to the president is we would have no choice. we would be compelled by necessity, not by our preference, to have to begin to plan fo
to collect information from u.s. facilities because lots of foreign traffic passes through there. now, we have not added restrictions because a lot of americans' traffic passes through foreign switches. we now have this global internet and so you can be sitting in boise and log on to your yahoo! account or your google account and you're actually talking to a server in finland which is getting information from a data center in south america. so the information in your account is being synchronized across the data centers so as it moves across you can have five years of e-mails packaged up moving across the wire and this program will intercept it. whether they keep it and under what circumstances, all those
obviously have an inside view of this relationship. and i think just the title is a strong indictment of u.s. policy towards pakistan. and in your words if i may quote, you said the u.s. pakistan relationship, a tale of exaggerated expectation, broken promises and disastrous misunderstandings. i want to delve into what you mean by that a little later in the interview but first i want to ask you a simple question. what motivated you to write this book? >> as this book has been on my mind for many years i went to college in 1979 when several of my colleagues -- i was in karachi in the south of pakistan but my colleagues as students in islamabad burned dow turned dow. embassy and people at karachi also wanted to go and burn down the u.s. consulate. all of this was over an incident that had taken place in the holy place of islam. the shrine had been taken over by government and the threat americans were involved so people just went berserk. i was somebody that said we can't do this. we have to wait. we will not be able to unburden it to the next day if we find out that the americans are not invo
. they have both sides of this deal. they can denounce the deal the u.s. still has important military relationships with the state of israel that are effectively unperturbed by this that willugh continue, including undertakings and understandings about what the u.s. will do to protect our common security interest rates that might be threatened by iran that are unaffected by the israeli denunciation of the atlomacy that helps them home and hedges against things that might go wrong in that diplomacy. they noticed a lot of other people who were concerned about iran and making statements that say, "i do not trust iran" in effect. who does? the policies of this and the percentages in the different place. i have some empathy. say theywhen people support new sanctions, but the sanctions would be made conditional on waiting to see whether or not we failed to get a final deal and the sanctions might then be put on a suspense so they would go into effect after efforts to get a final deal. if you study what is involved, you will see how much iran's good faith will be tested by all of the activit
extend the disability rights of americans to disabled people in other countries. the u.s. signed onto the treaty in 2009, but ratification the senate failed in 2012. this hearing is just over 2.5 hours. >> the hearing of the senate foreign relations committee will come to order. let me welcome our panelists and all of our guests who have come here today for this important hearing on the rights of roughly one billion people around the world with disabilities. let me quickly welcome three guests. among them, congressman tony coelho, who has been a longtime champion of the rights of the disabled. let me also recognize ann cody, representing the u.s. on three paralympic teams. she was also nominated to be the vice president of the international paralympic committee. she understands it is not just enough to make the stadium accessible. you need to make surrounding restaurants and businesses accessible, and we thank you for being here or your advocacy as well. i also want to recognize a leader in the disability community in macedonia. she is here to learn about transportation and independen
. and i applaud the u.s. this leadership. and then on the logistics, i one really do thank our department of defense. i they understand how to get to people who have been isolated e and to get a better assessment. let me point out one obvious ano point here. p most of the damage was done on s the coast. and that's what we saw.tha we could reach the coast.t' we could not reach communities isolated from the coast. therefore, initially, there wasn't a good understanding as to the severity of the damage inland. do we now have some indication as to whether there is going to be additional significant losses as a result of reaching people that we weren't able to reach originally?cant los >> thank you, senator. we did initially focus on the coast. we also did initial over-land and overflight assessments in some of the inland areas, as as well, working with our dod rkini colleagues. our initial assessment was that. l areas were the worst affected so that was the first priority for focus.at as that situation has started to stabilize, maybe too strong a word but let's say head in the e direction o
. we see it as an ambush. >> pakistani leaders blame the u.s. for sab damaging peace talks. >> murder charges laid after the shooting at lax. >>> secretary of state john kerry is in the middle east in the hopes of repairing tensions with gulf allies over syria. he will have stops in israel, jordan and saudi arabia. first a visit to egypt. this morning john kerry urged egypt to move ahead with democratic reforms, stressing u.s. ties with the country are vital. >> i wanted to first express to the egyptian people as clearly and force fully as i can, in no uncertainly terms, the united states is a friend of the people of egypt, of the country of egypt, and we are a partner to your county. >> john kerry's visit marks the first by an american official since the ousting of mohamed morsi in july. >> we have some news from sue with breaking news. you have information on the meeting with the arab league. >> yes, it's emerging that the discussions that the egyptian foreign minister and u.s. secretary of state had this afternoon included the situation with regards to syria. we are hearing from th
we're following this hero. u.s. secretary of state john kerry is joining talks in geneva to try to help negotiators reach a deal over iran's nuclear program. >>> authorities in china have the man they expect was involved in a deadly bombing outside a communist party building. >>> and the strongest typhoon of the year has hit the philippines and residents are running for cover. >>> the u.s. secretary of state is joining talks over iran's nuclear program. john kerry is trying to assist negotiators from iran and six major countries reach a breakthrough deal. kerry changed his schedule and flew to geneva after a visit to the middle east. iranian negotiators are meeting with their counterparts from the u.s., russia, china, britain, france, and germany. the negotiators from the six countries want iran to scale back its uranium enrichment program to alleviate concerns over the country's suspected development of nuclear weapons. in return, the u.s. and other countries say they might consider relaxing sanctions that crippled iran's economy. u.s. president barack obama says there is a pos
for you. an effort to limit filibusters in the u.s. senate. how it could bring about major change. the u.s. security agreement with afghanistan could be on hold. what it could mean for american forces. and the story behind this, the final resting place of jfk. >>> there could be a game changer considering that security agreement between the u.s. and afghanistan. it involves the issue of trust. afghan president, karzai, indicating that he does not trust the u.s. the well is so tainted, that president obama sent a letter to karzai promising to respect his nation's laws and sovereignty withdrawing with caution. and mike, the leadership that the president needs right now, is to be broadsided by karzai. >> one more thing from karzai to this president in particular. you're right, the president has written a letter to him, saying that yes, we have come to an agreement on the bilateral security agreement. and the united states is on questioned to ending the combat mission of american forces in afghanistan. the longest war in american history. the president writes that karzai will be cooperating an
with u.s. airways making american the largest carrier in the country. before the deal went through the justice department made american open up major hubs to smaller airlines and cut back on routes and a number of flights. on this edition of "inside story" we're going to talk about the mega merger and what it means for the flying public. the merger between american and u.s. airways is a $17 billion deal. the new american will carry 130 million passengers annually. it will operate 6700 flights to 500 destination nationwide. it will allow the new american airlines to become king of the air waives. airwaves. it must give up gates and landing slots in seven major airport including new york, los angeles, and ronald reagan washington airport in washington, d.c. those slots will go to lower cost carriers. american must now sell 104 take-off and landing slots. >> we expressed potential reduction in competition that the merger would potentially empose. >> the justice department initially blocked the deal fearing competition. but in a statement the attorney general eric holder sought to reas
inside view of this relationship and i think just the title is a strong indictment towards the u.s. and pakistan. you say that the relationship, entail of exaggerated expectations and broken promises and disastrous misunderstandings, i would like to delve into what you mean by that little later in the interview. at first i'm asking you a simple question. what motivated you to write this book? >> guest: this book has been on my mind for so many years. i was a college student in 1979. several of my colleagues, as in students, burned it down the u.s. embassy and people also wanted to go down to the u.s. consulate in berlin that done as well. all of this had taken place when the holiest mosque and shrine of government had been taken down. so people just went berserk. and i was someone who said no, we can't do this, we have to wait. we burned down the building, we won't be able to on verdict on the next day. if we wait, we could find out that the americans are not involved. because of that come i was always wondering why the pakistanis have this knee-jerk anti-americanism. because what
th region that the u.s. military, u as you said, in addition to to being an unmatched fighting force, also brings unmatched logistical capabilities. which they use, unfortunately al have to use quite often in the f region for disaster response. i think that's gone widely noticed. i wouldn't want to speculate on why the chinese have responded the way they have. i do know at some point d philippine authorities suggestet there was no need for further gd medical equipment and support, r whether that played a role on ma the hospital ship not coming, i'm not sure. ship i think the more important point from our perspective is by doing the right thing, we've seen seen in the region as doing the righe thing.st >> well, just my editorial comment to close, and i don't expect you to respond to it, bur we have this debate going on in this country how engaged the u.s. needs to be around the world diplomatically in aid programs, and of course militarily with our presence. this is an example what would mi happen if the u.s. did retreat e from the global stage.. there is no substitute for the united
>> in addition to announcing a review of u.s. ties, the pakistani government also summoned the u.s. ambassador to warn of a standoff and less drone attacks ceased. also financing the strike from the leading pakistani opposition leader imran kahn proposed a ban on nato supply trucks inside pakistan. ofn accused the u.s. sabotaging the peace talks. >> i feel sad that just as the dialogue was about to start take, those who are still part in the talks, were killed yesterday. >> the pakistani taliban has sayed asly picked kahn its new leader. the suspect in friday's armed attack at the los angeles international airport could face the death penalty for shooting dead a transportation security administration officer and wounding five other people. is charged with murdering a federal officer and committing violence at an international airport. the head of the police at lax described the attack. >> at 9:20 this morning, in individual came into terminal 3 of this airport, pulled an assault rifle out of a bag and began to open fire in the terminal. he proceeded up into the screening area wher
to measure the outputs. to find out what the u.s. gets back from it. at the same time, the kind of investment that the united states makes to use an example of sending african american jazz musicians overseas, necessarily contrasts with the realities of what the u.s.'s civil rights record was at the time. and certainly it becomes something that looks less credible in the minds of a lot of foreign publics, when the u.s.'s actual face looks extremely militaryized. and it's very difficult to overcome that. >> spencer our community is coming in here. here is howard . . . willow you are at the fault line here. you are a very well-known writer. you speak arabic and have an egyptian husband. oftentimes do you feel the burden of being a global cultural ambassador who has to bridge the dieds? >> i try not to think about it in those terms. in order to make good art, one has to be true first and foremost to the story it is trying to tell. so that has been my experience. i always try to be conscious of the fact that whatever you do, and no matter what you do, you do represent your own community to both b
or not we should be putting nuclear power plants with u.s. cooperation in countries like vietnam knowing without proper protection there could be catastrophic consequences that flow from the interaction of a natural disaster and a nuclear power plant that is not as strong or well positioned as it could be. we just saw that in japan. they are going to be going several generations with the consequences of a natural disaster link to nuclear power plants. so from my perspective, i want to congratulate everyone who participated in helping, especially in these early stages of relief. but i think for usaid, for the state department, for the defense department, i think that we all have to come together in a way that deals with the national security consequences s of climate change. the impact that it's having upon our allies and our enemies that modifies their behavior in terms of how they are able to, in fact, control their own environment. and understand then what the consequences are for our national security because theirs is undermined. so again, it's just one more warning. if we needed it,
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